EchoesOfAKora

Echoes of A Kora: Unincorporated Non-profit Org.

About:
Mission:This blog is to expose international based issues, and topics. Echoes of a Kora enables children to pursue an education by providing basic school supplies to young people in need. Raising awareness about the lack of access to education around the world, each bag contains adequate materials for one student to learn for one year. We also provide basic teaching supplies to teachers and educators in villages and local orphanages that surround them Echoes of a Kora includes environmentally sustainable and ethically produced tools and materials to initiate environmental education that can be heard and echoed all throughout the globe.
About: Lack of access to or readiness of, adequate school supplies and materials prohibits many children from learning and teachers to teach. Acquisition of knowledge is the first step on the path to global sustainability, prosperity, and world peace; innovation and progress stem from knowledge, a universal right. Echoes of a Kora will allow students to further their studies, and teachers to provide the best teaching environment specifically to villages and also to orphanages.
Echoes of a Kora officially started in May 2011 with an idea that generated from a trip to Nigeria in 2008. After spending some months in Ugep (2nd largest village in Cross River State, neighboring city Calabar), it was apparent that the basic tools in the classroom and outside of It wasn’t available. Through further inquiries, the need for academic resources for children and teachers was prevalent and something needed to be done. It has now become a long term commitment and duty to provide the basic essentials to students and teachers in order for them to attain great academic tools in addition to resources that are limited.

EOK’s Basic Essentials
Pens
Pencils
Chalk
Rulers
Erasers
Notebooks
New/Used Children’s Books
Backpacks
Folders
Crayons
Coloring Books
Other forms of donations are more than welcome!

Ever been in a phase where friends who once always made you happy now just irritate you? Possibly because they’ve been away for some time? If so? What is the solution for that? Does this also fall under the bracket that this friendship has expired and it’s time to let them go? Or is it just a phase that females just sometimes go through or am I just a weirdo ? 😏

snapitoga:

Love the colourful trucks here :) 

snapitoga:

Love the colourful trucks here :) 

thepeoplesrecord:

New, privatized African city heralds climate apartheidJanuary 21, 2014
It’s a sight to behold. Just off Lagos, Nigeria’s coast, an artificial island is emerging from the sea. A foundation, built of sand dredged from the ocean floor, stretches over ten kilometres. Promotional videos depict what is to come: a city of soaring buildings, housing for 250,000 people, and a central boulevard to match Paris’ Champs-Élysées and New York’s Fifth Avenue. Privately constructed, it will also be privately administered and supplied with electricity, water, mass transit, sewage and security. It is the “future Hong Kong of Africa,” anticipates Nigeria’s World Bank director.
Welcome to Eko Atlantic, a city whose “whole purpose”, its developers say, is to “arrest the ocean’s encroachment.” Like many low-lying coastal African countries, Nigeria has been hit hard by a rising sea-level, which has regularly washed away thousands of peoples’ homes. To defend against the coastal erosion and flooding, the city is being surrounded by the “Great Wall of Lagos”, a sea defence barrier made of 100,000 five-ton concrete blocks. Eko Atlantic will be a “sustainable city, clean and energy efficient with minimal carbon emissions,” offer jobs, prosperity and new land for Nigerians, and serve as a bulwark in the fight against the impacts of climate change.
At least that’s the official story. Other facts suggest this gleaming city will be a menacing allure to most. In congested Lagos, Africa’s largest city, there is little employment and millions work and scavenge in a vast, desperate informal economy. Sixty percent of Nigeria’s population – almost 100 of 170 million people – live on less than a dollar a day. Preventable diseases are widespread; electricity and clean water hard to come by. A few kilometres down the Lagos shoreline, Nigerians eke out an existence in the aquatic slum of Makoko, built precariously on stilts over the ocean. Casting them as crime-ridden, the government regularly dismantles such slums, bulldozing homes and evicting thousands. These are hardly the people who will scoop up square footage in Eko Atlantic’s pricy new high-rises.
Those behind the project – a pair of politically connected Lebanese brothers who run a financial empire called the Chagoury Group, and a slew of African and international banks – give a picture of who will be catered to. Gilbert Chaougry was a close advisor to the notorious Nigerian dictatorship of the mid 1990s, helping the ultra-corrupt general Sani Abacha as he looted billions from public coffers. Abacha killed hundreds of demonstrators and executed environmentalist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who rose to fame protesting the despoiling of the country by Shell and other multinational oil corporations. Thus it’s fitting for whom the first 15-story office tower in Eko Atlantic is being built: a British oil and gas trading company. The city proposing to head off environmental devastation will be populated by those most responsible for it in the first place.
The real inspiration for Eko Atlantic comes not from these men but the dreamworlds of rampant capitalism, stoked by a successful, thirty year global campaign to claw back gains in social security and unchain corporations from regulation – what we now know as neoliberalism. In Nigeria, oil wealth plundered by a military elite spawned extreme inequalities and upended the economy. Under the IMF’s neoliberal dictates, the situation worsened: education and healthcare were gutted, industries privatized, and farmers ruined by western products dumped on their markets. The World Bank celebrated Nigeria; extreme poverty doubled. The most notorious application of the power of the Nigerian state for the interest of the rich came in 1990: an entire district of Lagos - 300,000 homes – was razed to clear the way for high-end real-estate development.
As elites in Nigeria and elsewhere have embraced such inequality as the very engine of growth, they have revived some of the most extreme forms of colonial segregation and gated leisure. Today, boutiques cannot open fast enough to serve the Nigerian millionaires buying luxury cars and yachts they’ll be able to dock in Eko Atlantic’s down-town marina. Meanwhile, thousands of people who live in communities along the coast expect the new city will bring displacement, not prosperity, says environmental activist Nnimmo Bassey. To get their way, the developers, backed by industry and politicians, have trampled over the country’s environmental assessment process. “Building Eko Atlantic is contrary to anything one would want to do if one took seriously climate change and resource depletion,” he says.
The wealthy and powerful may in fact take climate change seriously: not as a demand to modify their behaviour or question the fossil-fuel driven global economy that has made it possible, but as the biggest opportunity yet to realize their dreams of unfettered accumulation and consumption. The disaster capitalists behind Eko Atlantic have seized on climate change to push through pro-corporate plans to build a city of their dreams, an architectural insult to the daily circumstances of ordinary Nigerians. The criminalized poor abandoned outside their walls may once have served as sufficient justification for their flight and fortification – but now they have the very real threat of climate change as well.
Eko Atlantic is where you can begin to see a possible future – a vision of privatized green enclaves for the ultra rich ringed by slums lacking water or electricity, in which a surplus population scramble for depleting resources and shelter to fend off the coming floods and storms. Protected by guards, guns, and an insurmountable gully – real estate prices – the rich will shield themselves from the rising tides of poverty and a sea that is literally rising. A world in which the rich and powerful exploit the global ecological crisis to widen and entrench already extreme inequalities and seal themselves off from its impacts – this is climate apartheid.
Prepare for the elite, like never before, to use climate change to transform neighbourhoods, cities, even entire nations into heavily fortified islands. Already, around the world, from Afghanistan to Arizona, China to Cairo, and in mushrooming mega-cities much like Lagos, those able are moving to areas where they can live better and often more greenly – with better transport and renewable technologies, green buildings and ecological services. In Sao Paulo, Brazil, the super-rich – ferried above the congested city by a fleet of hundreds of helicopters – have disembedded themselves from urban life, attempting to escape from a common fate. 
In places like Eko Atlantic the escape, a moral and social secession of the rich from those in their country, will be complete. This essentially utopian drive – to consume rapaciously and endlessly and to reject any semblance of collective impulse and concern – is simply incompatible with human survival. But at the moment when we must confront an economy and ideology pushing the planet’s life-support systems to breaking point, this is what the neoliberal imagination offers us: a grotesque monument to the ultra-rich flight from responsibility.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

New, privatized African city heralds climate apartheid
January 21, 2014

It’s a sight to behold. Just off Lagos, Nigeria’s coast, an artificial island is emerging from the sea. A foundation, built of sand dredged from the ocean floor, stretches over ten kilometres. Promotional videos depict what is to come: a city of soaring buildings, housing for 250,000 people, and a central boulevard to match Paris’ Champs-Élysées and New York’s Fifth Avenue. Privately constructed, it will also be privately administered and supplied with electricity, water, mass transit, sewage and security. It is the “future Hong Kong of Africa,” anticipates Nigeria’s World Bank director.

Welcome to Eko Atlantic, a city whose “whole purpose”, its developers say, is to “arrest the ocean’s encroachment.” Like many low-lying coastal African countries, Nigeria has been hit hard by a rising sea-level, which has regularly washed away thousands of peoples’ homes. To defend against the coastal erosion and flooding, the city is being surrounded by the “Great Wall of Lagos”, a sea defence barrier made of 100,000 five-ton concrete blocks. Eko Atlantic will be a “sustainable city, clean and energy efficient with minimal carbon emissions,” offer jobs, prosperity and new land for Nigerians, and serve as a bulwark in the fight against the impacts of climate change.

At least that’s the official story. Other facts suggest this gleaming city will be a menacing allure to most. In congested Lagos, Africa’s largest city, there is little employment and millions work and scavenge in a vast, desperate informal economy. Sixty percent of Nigeria’s population – almost 100 of 170 million people – live on less than a dollar a day. Preventable diseases are widespread; electricity and clean water hard to come by. A few kilometres down the Lagos shoreline, Nigerians eke out an existence in the aquatic slum of Makoko, built precariously on stilts over the ocean. Casting them as crime-ridden, the government regularly dismantles such slums, bulldozing homes and evicting thousands. These are hardly the people who will scoop up square footage in Eko Atlantic’s pricy new high-rises.

Those behind the project – a pair of politically connected Lebanese brothers who run a financial empire called the Chagoury Group, and a slew of African and international banks – give a picture of who will be catered to. Gilbert Chaougry was a close advisor to the notorious Nigerian dictatorship of the mid 1990s, helping the ultra-corrupt general Sani Abacha as he looted billions from public coffers. Abacha killed hundreds of demonstrators and executed environmentalist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who rose to fame protesting the despoiling of the country by Shell and other multinational oil corporations. Thus it’s fitting for whom the first 15-story office tower in Eko Atlantic is being built: a British oil and gas trading company. The city proposing to head off environmental devastation will be populated by those most responsible for it in the first place.

The real inspiration for Eko Atlantic comes not from these men but the dreamworlds of rampant capitalism, stoked by a successful, thirty year global campaign to claw back gains in social security and unchain corporations from regulation – what we now know as neoliberalism. In Nigeria, oil wealth plundered by a military elite spawned extreme inequalities and upended the economy. Under the IMF’s neoliberal dictates, the situation worsened: education and healthcare were gutted, industries privatized, and farmers ruined by western products dumped on their markets. The World Bank celebrated Nigeria; extreme poverty doubled. The most notorious application of the power of the Nigerian state for the interest of the rich came in 1990: an entire district of Lagos - 300,000 homes – was razed to clear the way for high-end real-estate development.

As elites in Nigeria and elsewhere have embraced such inequality as the very engine of growth, they have revived some of the most extreme forms of colonial segregation and gated leisure. Today, boutiques cannot open fast enough to serve the Nigerian millionaires buying luxury cars and yachts they’ll be able to dock in Eko Atlantic’s down-town marina. Meanwhile, thousands of people who live in communities along the coast expect the new city will bring displacement, not prosperity, says environmental activist Nnimmo Bassey. To get their way, the developers, backed by industry and politicians, have trampled over the country’s environmental assessment process. “Building Eko Atlantic is contrary to anything one would want to do if one took seriously climate change and resource depletion,” he says.

The wealthy and powerful may in fact take climate change seriously: not as a demand to modify their behaviour or question the fossil-fuel driven global economy that has made it possible, but as the biggest opportunity yet to realize their dreams of unfettered accumulation and consumption. The disaster capitalists behind Eko Atlantic have seized on climate change to push through pro-corporate plans to build a city of their dreams, an architectural insult to the daily circumstances of ordinary Nigerians. The criminalized poor abandoned outside their walls may once have served as sufficient justification for their flight and fortification – but now they have the very real threat of climate change as well.

Eko Atlantic is where you can begin to see a possible future – a vision of privatized green enclaves for the ultra rich ringed by slums lacking water or electricity, in which a surplus population scramble for depleting resources and shelter to fend off the coming floods and storms. Protected by guards, guns, and an insurmountable gully – real estate prices – the rich will shield themselves from the rising tides of poverty and a sea that is literally rising. A world in which the rich and powerful exploit the global ecological crisis to widen and entrench already extreme inequalities and seal themselves off from its impacts – this is climate apartheid.

Prepare for the elite, like never before, to use climate change to transform neighbourhoods, cities, even entire nations into heavily fortified islands. Already, around the world, from Afghanistan to Arizona, China to Cairo, and in mushrooming mega-cities much like Lagos, those able are moving to areas where they can live better and often more greenly – with better transport and renewable technologies, green buildings and ecological services. In Sao Paulo, Brazil, the super-rich – ferried above the congested city by a fleet of hundreds of helicopters – have disembedded themselves from urban life, attempting to escape from a common fate. 

In places like Eko Atlantic the escape, a moral and social secession of the rich from those in their country, will be complete. This essentially utopian drive – to consume rapaciously and endlessly and to reject any semblance of collective impulse and concern – is simply incompatible with human survival. But at the moment when we must confront an economy and ideology pushing the planet’s life-support systems to breaking point, this is what the neoliberal imagination offers us: a grotesque monument to the ultra-rich flight from responsibility.

Full article

Happy new year!

oxfamgb:

Happy new year! 2013 was a big year, and together we had a big impact – thanks in part to regular donations from supporters like you. Monthly gifts are the backbone of our work – they mean we can respond immediately when disaster hits, without having to wait for funds to come in. And we can start long-term projects, so everyone can plan for a better future.

It all adds up to big change – so please SHARE to spread the word of how you helped lift lives in 2013.

snapitoga:

And 2014 is here in Lagos, another year of hustle begins! Wish you all a very happy new year. 

Love my country!!

snapitoga:

And 2014 is here in Lagos, another year of hustle begins! Wish you all a very happy new year. 

Love my country!!

Are you a leader or a follower ?

I believe I was born to lead. Yes, granted my life is not perfectly structured but I have goals and a plan. Who am I leading through my life’s examples? My friends, possibly my little brother, my peers. Even though some times a leader may have trouble with some things, a leader is chosen because of their strength, their ability to change, mold or give meaning to a persons life. In every aspect of life there is always a Leader, either it be God, your parents etc, you’re proud to learn from them because they bring out the best in you. Lately, the leaders around me haven’t quite made a huge impression on me because some of them have failed to show me what differentiates a leader from a follower.

unicefusa:

Here it is, our little bundle of joy! http://uncf.us/IDxPCyThe Mind & Body bundle from UNICEF Inspired Gifts is an inspiring collection of gifts for children coping with crisis. A Soccer Ball, Storybooks and Notebooks & Pencils - together they can restore the ability to imagine, play and dreamHelp their spirits soar again. Gift your Mind & Body bundle now!

unicefusa:

Here it is, our little bundle of joy! http://uncf.us/IDxPCy

The Mind & Body bundle from UNICEF Inspired Gifts is an inspiring collection of gifts for children coping with crisis. A Soccer Ball, Storybooks and Notebooks & Pencils - together they can restore the ability to imagine, play and dream

Help their spirits soar again. Gift your Mind & Body bundle now!

unicef:

Almost 230 million children under 5 have not had their birth registered, denying them a fundamental human right and potentially excluding them from being able to go to school, access healthcare, vote, own a passport or even work. Find out more - and how we can change this in our new report on birth registration: http://uni.cf/birthreg

unicef:

Almost 230 million children under 5 have not had their birth registered, denying them a fundamental human right and potentially excluding them from being able to go to school, access healthcare, vote, own a passport or even work. Find out more - and how we can change this in our new report on birth registration: http://uni.cf/birthreg

spiritualinspiration:

13 Reasons to Pray1. Prayer opens the door to the secrets of God  Jeremiah 33:3, 1 Corinthians 2:9-10
2. Prayer puts our lives at peace with God and sets a place for us in eternity  Romans 10:9-10
3. Prayer changes our destiny and restores our nations  2 Chronicles 7:14
4.Prayer helps us to find (and keeps us in) the will of God Colossians 4:12
5.Prayer gives us boldness  Acts 4:31
6. Prayer and fasting gives you supernatural power over demonic forces  Matthew 17:21
7. Prayer protects our families, blesses men and keeps worldly and godly authorities in order  1 Timothy 2:1-2
8. Prayer keeps us from temptations  Matthew 6:13, 26:41
9. Prayer is our path to perfect peace and our substitute for anxiety  Philippians 4:6-7, Isaiah 26:3
10. Prayer is God’s will  1 Thessalonians 5:16-18
11. Prayer makes good what we eat!  1 Timothy 4:5
12. Prayer heals our physical bodies  James 5:15
13.Prayer gives us strength and wisdom to handle our enemies  Psalm 109:3-4

spiritualinspiration:

13 Reasons to Pray

1. Prayer opens the door to the secrets of God
Jeremiah 33:3, 1 Corinthians 2:9-10

2. Prayer puts our lives at peace with God and sets a place for us in eternity
Romans 10:9-10

3. Prayer changes our destiny and restores our nations
2 Chronicles 7:14

4.Prayer helps us to find (and keeps us in) the will of God
Colossians 4:12

5.Prayer gives us boldness
Acts 4:31

6. Prayer and fasting gives you supernatural power over demonic forces
Matthew 17:21

7. Prayer protects our families, blesses men and keeps worldly and godly authorities in order
1 Timothy 2:1-2

8. Prayer keeps us from temptations
Matthew 6:13, 26:41

9. Prayer is our path to perfect peace and our substitute for anxiety
Philippians 4:6-7, Isaiah 26:3

10. Prayer is God’s will
1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

11. Prayer makes good what we eat!
1 Timothy 4:5

12. Prayer heals our physical bodies
James 5:15

13.Prayer gives us strength and wisdom to handle our enemies
Psalm 109:3-4

(via kaylahraquel)